Posts Tagged ‘usb

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If you still have one of the first generation iPhone mobile phones or an iPod touch there was no way that you could get a GPS module for your device, unlike the lucky owners of the new iPhone 3G devices, at least until now. A company called Orange Gadgets started accepting pre-orders for their external GPS module for iPhone and iPod touch claiming they’ll start shipping the first devices in just a few days (10/22/2008). You’ll have to prepare $75 for the external GPS device and have in mind that in order to take advantage of it you’ll have to jailbreak your phone or music player, because of the software that accompanies it.


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The iGPS360 module is designed as a direct plug-in for your device and it has a built-in battery back-up which will store the last acquired GPS satellite information on-board, enabling a fast GPS-lock re-acquisition time after the module has temporarily been switched off. You can always charge the built-in battery trough an external USB port on the GPS and you should have in mind that the GPS won’t drain power from your iPhone or iPod in order to charge it’s internal backup battery.

You will need to install a GPS application on your iPhone or iPod Touch that can access the iGPS360 module, because Orange Gadgets ships you only the hardware module and not the software. Luckily there are a few good apps out there that will do the job well and the best software that currently works with the module is the xGPS software developed by xWaves. You can alternatively use Simba’s Hike.app or RoadMap, but these work only on 1.x firmwares and not with the newer 2.x ones.


The price of the iGPS360 is $75 and it is expected to start shipping on october 22th.

For more information about iGPS360 External GPS module for iPhone and iPod touch…

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PicoLCD is a family of Intelligent USB LCD displays with true HID USB interface, that you can connect to your PC with ease and use them to display any info you want on them. Current end existent products range from simple 2×20 LCDs, 4×20 as well as graphic models. The picoLCD has strong application support (SDK included) for Windows XP and Linux as well as native Vista SideShow auxiliary display driver support and SDK. But the most interesting model seems to be the PicoLCD 4×20 Auxiliary Display with Vista Sideshow support, because it is more affordable, quite useful and even very cool looking, compared to the simpler smaller screens or the graphical models. That is why we are going to look into the PicoLCD 4×20 Auxiliary Display…

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You can use this cool external device to show Vista Sideshow applications (stocks, weather, music information, news and sports updates) on a 2nd dedicated LCD display that also looks very cool on your desk, especially with the blue backlight of the screen. The PicoLCD display has the ability to display 4 lines of text data with up to 20 characters on each line with gives you the ability to display quite a lot of data on the screen. The unit is self-powered via a full speed USB connection so there is no need for any external power supply. The device also has some built-in functional buttons allowing direct control on some of it’s functions, without having to touch the keyboard or the mouse on the PC. However you should have in mind that the PicoLCD 4×20 Auxiliary Display requires Microsoft Windows Vista operating system, and that the Vista Home Edition does not come with Sideshow functionality supported. You can also use the device with Linux, because it also has drivers for different Linux distributions available.

The price of the PicoLCD 4X20-Sideshow is $49.95.

To get a PicoLCD 4×20 Auxiliary Display for your PC…

The German company TrekStor showed of quite an interesting product at IFA, we are talking about an upgradeable wireless sound system called the Wireless SoundBox. The system is using a small audio transmitter in the form of a USB stick that transfers your favorite digital music noise-free (using 2,4 GHz radio frequency) from the PC to the Wireless SoundBox’s loudspeakers. The transmitter and the loudspeakers can be up to 25 meters apart, meaning you can place the speakers in any room at home or in the office. The compact stereo loudspeakers also have individual volume control, power button and a line-in connection for MP3 players or other audio sources for direct connection to the speaker. The Wireless SoundBox is powered by 4 batteries (when in wireless mode) which can last for up to 12 hours of music playback, and you can always switch the speakers to be powered by USB connection, although you’ll still need to use cables for that. It would have been a nice idea to include rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that could be charged by plugging the speaker to a USB connector, but maybe that will be available in the next version.

The speakers come with a very attractive look and compact size, providing up to a 0.5W each and weighting about 140 grams each (without the four batteries), which should be more than enough to provide you with good and loud enough sound for home or small office use. The good thing is that after you get the starter kit, which consists of a speaker and the transmitter you can add up to 20 speakers later on using the same USB transmitter to provide them with a signal, so the sound system remains quite open and upgradable.

The Wireless SoundBox Starter Set, including a transmitter and a loudspeaker box, is available for about $70. Every additional loudspeaker will cost you additional $45. The Wireless SoundBox is expected to be available for sale in the next month (October).

For more information about the TrekStor Wireless SoundBox Speakers…


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